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IDT News

Exploring new space frontiers

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IDT, Inc., is proud to announce the success of its Os Series, the first high-speed cameras in space, on the first unmanned Exploration Test Flight (EFT-1) of Lockheed Martin’s Orion spacecraft. The excellent performance of three Os cameras mounted on the spacecraft provided essential data that will help ensure the safety of astronauts on future manned flights. IDT also had cameras on the ground, recording the launch.

Staying in constant motion has made IDT the top innovator in the field of high-speed digital imaging. We were the frontrunners for this mission because our scientists have a reputation for fearlessly tackling seemingly impossible challenges and coming up with groundbreaking solutions — that work.

The launch on December 5, 2014, was the first flight test of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), designed to carry astronauts into space, protect and sustain them during space travel, and safely return them to Earth. It took off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 37 in Florida, orbited Earth twice in a four-plus-hour journey, and landed in the Pacific Ocean.

News Photo: Orion Recovery

This test flight studied many critical safety systems, including the landing parachute deployment. That’s where IDT’s three cameras came in, observing the parachutes at various specific points during re-entry and landing.

Our miniature marvels were the only ones Lockheed found to be small enough and have the right functionality for recording such events as the parachute hatch deployment, the positioning of the cords, and the opening of the chutes themselves. Lockheed also needed cameras that could be highly flexible in configuring such factors as resolution and framerate, and that could be powered up after launch, during the flight as needed.

IDT’s scientists also developed a “Mission Mode” for the Os Series, allowing specific sequences of events with different parameters to be programmed in advance. But the challenges didn’t end there. The cameras had to survive launch and re-entry, plus exposure to salt water, and retain the data until it could be recovered from their solid-state drives.

We passed all these tests with flying colors on December 5, and we’re eager to meet the next set of challenges. The success of EFT-1 is just the first step in sending humans to deep-space destinations, such as asteroids or Mars. And, true to our own drive to use today’s great ideas as a platform for expanding our vision into tomorrow, IDT will be providing the next generation of high-speed cameras for future Orion missions.

IDT offers highly integrated systems that include high-speed digital imaging, data acquisition, and signal synchronization modules. We embrace industry standards such as high-speed USB and Gigabit Ethernet to supply reliable plug-and-play instruments that are cost-effective and user-friendly.

All slow motion footage in the video below is from an IDT Os camera.

Testing Parachutes for Mars

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NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., tested the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft with IDT High Speed cameras.  The parachute for NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory passed flight-qualification testing  inside the world’s largest wind tunnel, at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.

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In this image, an engineer is dwarfed by the parachute, the largest ever built to fly on an extraterrestrial flight. It is designed to survive deployment at Mach 2.2 in the Martian atmosphere, where it will generate up to 65,000 pounds of drag force.

You can read the full article here.

Below is a high speed video of the parachute test shot with an IDT OS10-4K camera.

OS With Expanded Record Capacity

8, 16, 32 GB hubs by IDT

The Os-series is a new digital high-speed camera designed to operate in the most demanding environments. The salient design feature of the Os 4 are its compact size combined with a wide data bus, making it capable of achieving very high frame rates (up to 6,000 fps) including transfer speeds to high-capacity solid-state (non-volatile) memory. Configurable DDR options include 8GB, 16GB, and 32GB.

See more about the OS series

Veritas Constellation 120 LED by IDT vs. EG&G IGBT high powered Strobe

News Photo: Veritas .vs EGG

The Veritas high speed LED lights continue to receive praises from customers worldwide. For many high speed camera applications we sell one or more Veritas lights with each IDT high speed camera. We were recently asked to compare our Constellation 120 LED with a customers existing EG&G high powered high speed IGBT strobe. The results are below. As can be clearly seen the image captured with the Constellation 120 is brighter. This additional light could be used to further shorten the exposure time of 50µs or close the aperture further. Check out the specifications of our lights on our website.

Os Aces Orion Spacecraft Test Launch

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IDT, Inc., is proud to announce the success of its Os Series, the first high-speed cameras in space, on the first unmanned Exploration Test Flight (EFT-1) of Lockheed Martin’s Orion spacecraft. The excellent performance of three Os cameras mounted on the spacecraft provided essential data that will help ensure the safety of astronauts on future manned flights. IDT also had cameras on the ground, recording the launch.

Staying in constant motion has made IDT the top innovator in the field of high-speed digital imaging. We were the frontrunners for this mission because our scientists have a reputation for fearlessly tackling seemingly impossible challenges and coming up with groundbreaking solutions — that work.

The launch on December 5, 2014, was the first flight test of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), designed to carry astronauts into space, protect and sustain them during space travel, and safely return them to Earth. It took off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 37 in Florida, orbited Earth twice in a four-plus-hour journey, and landed in the Pacific Ocean.

News Photo: Orion Recovery

This test flight studied many critical safety systems, including the landing parachute deployment. That’s where IDT’s three cameras came in, observing the parachutes at various specific points during re-entry and landing.

Our miniature marvels were the only ones Lockheed found to be small enough and have the right functionality for recording such events as the parachute hatch deployment, the positioning of the cords, and the opening of the chutes themselves. Lockheed also needed cameras that could be highly flexible in configuring such factors as resolution and framerate, and that could be powered up after launch, during the flight as needed.

IDT’s scientists also developed a “Mission Mode” for the Os Series, allowing specific sequences of events with different parameters to be programmed in advance. But the challenges didn’t end there. The cameras had to survive launch and re-entry, plus exposure to salt water, and retain the data until it could be recovered from their solid-state drives.

We passed all these tests with flying colors on December 5, and we’re eager to meet the next set of challenges. The success of EFT-1 is just the first step in sending humans to deep-space destinations, such as asteroids or Mars. And, true to our own drive to use today’s great ideas as a platform for expanding our vision into tomorrow, IDT will be providing the next generation of high-speed cameras for future Orion missions.

IDT offers highly integrated systems that include high-speed digital imaging, data acquisition, and signal synchronization modules. We embrace industry standards such as high-speed USB and Gigabit Ethernet to supply reliable plug-and-play instruments that are cost-effective and user-friendly.

All slow motion footage in the video below is from an IDT Os camera.

IDT in the March 2015 issue of Automotive Testing Technology International Magazine

IDT High Speed Camera in Automotive Testing Magazine

IDT makes an appearance in the March 2015 issue of Automotive Testing Technology International Magazine thanks to Johnson Controls!

Johnson Controls, a Global diversified technology and industrial leader serving more than 150 countries uses IDT’s NX Series cameras and Hubs for advanced data analysis at its Automotive Seating development centers.

The NX can sustain an impact of up to 200G’s which makes it a perfect candidate for impact testing as described in this article.

We’ve condensed the full article here.

You can view the entire magazine here.